In its first use inside the human body, CRISPR genome editing tested as blindness therapy

first_img Dr. Jason Comander of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, which plans to enroll patients in the CRISPR study, said it marks “a new era in medicine.” Rodrique Ngowi/AP In its first use inside the human body, CRISPR genome editing tested as blindness therapy STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints What’s included? Log In | Learn More In the Lab Scientists say they have used the gene editing tool CRISPR inside someone’s body for the first time, a new frontier for efforts to operate on DNA, the chemical code of life, to treat diseases.A patient recently had it done at the Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland for an inherited form of blindness, the companies that make the treatment announced Wednesday. They would not give details on the patient or when the surgery occurred. GET STARTED Associated Press By Associated Press March 4, 2020 Reprints What is it? Tags biotechnologyCRISPRgeneticsvisionlast_img read more

Feds Would Lift Block on Oil Leases in MT, ND, SD

first_img Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. BILLINGS – Federal officials want to move forward with oil and gas leases on about 260 square miles in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota that have been held up over climate change concerns.The government agreed in March to re-examine its leasing program in the three states after environmentalists filed a lawsuit seeking reductions in greenhouse gases released by companies during drilling.But in a series of studies released Thursday, the Bureau of Land Management said emissions from oil and gas drilling were negligible compared with other sources.The agency is recommending that drilling be allowed to proceed on about 36,000 acres of leases sold in 2008 but later suspended. Lease sales would be held in December on 130,000 acres that were deferred.At issue are greenhouse gases emitted by oil company trucks and equipment, and industry practices such as flaring methane directly into the atmosphere.The new BLM proposal includes steps companies can take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but no requirements that they do so, said BLM spokesman Greg Albright.An attorney for the environmental groups that sued over the 2008 leases said those steps were not enough.“It’s a lot of talk and not a lot of action,” said Erik Schlenker-Goodrich with the Western Environmental Law Center. “They’re really deciding to do the same as they did before. There’s been no change.”Nationwide, the Environmental Protection Agency says oil and gas operations account for about 23 percent of annual U.S. methane emissions and 2 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions.However, the BLM’s new studies said emissions in Montana would change only slightly under drilling that is anticipated if the 166,000 acres now held up gets developed.“It’s a pretty small number. The highest we have is 0.02 percent of the state total,” Albright said.A public comment period on the BLM proposal closes Sept. 13.last_img read more