How to open up our offices on tonight’s TRD Talk

first_imgDirector of Research & Analytics for CBRE Tri-State Nicole LaRusso, Vice Chairman & Director at Savills David Goldstein, and President of Newmark Knight Frank’s Tri-State region David FalkAt 2 p.m. Pacific/ 5 p.m. Eastern today, TRD Managing Web Editor James Kleimann will be joined by Director of Research & Analytics for CBRE Tri-State Nicole LaRusso, Vice Chairman & Director at Savills David Goldstein, and President of Newmark Knight Frank’s Tri-State region David Falk to discuss the future of office space.As mandatory stay-at-home orders begin to roll back, many office workers are wondering what kind of spaces they’ll be returning to. A recent TRD Insights article showed that a majority of spaces won’t be the same, with many companies saying they will reconfigure space, reopen in phases, and establish new policies for space usage. With companies as large as Twitter making working from home an option permanently it is clear that there will be new norms in every office.Office owners and brokers, too, wonder what this will mean for their business. An increase in staffers working from home could lead to a spike in office subletting. And debate continues over whether social distancing will mean companies need more square footage so workers can spread out or less as fewer people come in.Tonight, we’re bringing together three experts to weigh in on the future of the office market. Register here and tune in this afternoon. This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

The Fans Have Spoken! Your Fave 10 Monsters Who Have Stomped Down Broadway

first_img8. Giant, Into the Woods 2. Ursula, The Little Mermaid 3. Beast, Beauty and the Beast 6. Dementors, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child 4. Shrek, Shrek 7. Kong, King Kong 5. Monkeys, Wickedcenter_img 9. Trekkie Monster, Avenue Q In honor of last week’s larger-than-life Broadway opening for King Kong, we asked you about creatures of the past and present who have taken the Great White Way by storm. Fans ranked their faves, be them hairy, scaly, small or giant. Check out the top 10 list below!10. The Monster, Young Frankenstein (Illustration: Ryan Casey for Broadway.com) 1. Audrey 2, Little Shop of Horrors View Commentslast_img read more

NAI Horizon adds Eric Forshee as business development director

first_imgEric Forshee (Photo courtesy of NAI Horizon)Industry veteran Eric Forshee, has joined NAI Horizon as Director of Business Development.A resident of Cave Creek, Ariz., Forshee has more than 28 years of commercial real estate experience. He comes to NAI Horizon after nine years at Newmark Grubb Knight Frank (and Grubb & Ellis) as national director of business development for property management. Prior to that he served as director of property management for Trammell Crow Company. His work experience also includes stints at Insignia/ESG, Hallwood Management Company and Equitec Properties Company.While at NGKF, Forshee helped bring in more than 80 MSF of new management and leasing assignments nationally.“I am very excited to have Eric on our team,” said Terry Martin-Denning, CEO of NAI Horizon. “His experience and relationships in the industry are a valuable addition to our platform.”Forshee earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business management and finance from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He has past involvement with NAIOP, the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC), BOMA, and CoreNet Global. He is a USGBC LEED Green Associate (LEED GA), Real Property Administrator (RPA), and served as president of the Kiwanis Club of Phoenix (2006-2007).last_img read more

Video: IOMTT in full 360-degree view

first_imgAction cams have since become the ‘in’ thing amongst many motorcycling enthusiasts, both professionals and weekend warriors. One of the biggest evolution is the advent of 360-video recording ability, which now allows us to have a better view of events like the annual Isle of Man TT (IOMTT).This year’s running of the infamous and deadly road race garnered the support of 360-degree camera experts 360Fly, resulting in this epic ride-along video shot from the helmet-mounted cam of seasoned TT racer Gary Johnson.This year, Johnson competed astride a Kawasaki ZX-10R in the annual IOMTT Superbike race category – amongst others – and this 360-degree video gives us perhaps the best view of the event’s Snaefell Mountain Course.Fondly referred to as the ‘Mountain Course’, racers charge through a 60.725km stretch with more than 200 turns. The course is made up entirely of public roads used by the residents of this British isle and racers thunder across hazards like towns and huge cliff drops amongst others.This year’s edition saw living IOMTT legend and active veteran Michael Dunlop setting a new speed and lap record around the course astride a BMW S1000RR of 16 minutes 53.926 seconds and 215.591km/h respectively – the first rider to clock a sub 17-minute laptime and 214km/h barriers. (Read about that here)Check out the featured video above and see just how treacherous it is to tackle the deadly 60+km-long road racing course at speeds above 200km/h.Sources: YouTube via [email protected]–Ads– Get to grips with the infamous and deadly Isle of Man TT (IOMTT) road racing course in full 360-degree view.last_img read more

We’re techy, too! Deere, Tide maker head to CES gadget show

first_img John Deere has hauled in self-driving tractors and a 20-ton combine harvester aided by artificial intelligence, as the combine has cameras with computer-vision technology to track the quality of grain coming into the machine so that its kernel-separating settings can be adjusted automatically, so farmers can monitor it remotely using a smartphone app, shown at CES International Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) A Harley-Davidson Motorcycles LiveWire electric motorcycle is on display during a Panasonic news conference at CES International, Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher) People walk by the Procter & Gamble booth before CES International, Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher) Iris Xuan demonstrates a facial scanner from SK-II, a skin care company, at the Procter & Gamble booth before CES International, Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, in Las Vegas. The scanner takes measurements of the user’s face to give a “skin age” to help the user pick cosmetic products from the company. (AP Photo/John Locher) John Deere has hauled in a 20-ton combine harvester aided by artificial intelligence, while the combine has cameras with computer-vision technology to track the quality of grain coming into the machine so that its kernel-separating settings can be adjusted automatically, as farmers can monitor it remotely using a smartphone app, shown at CES International Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) Gillette’s Heated Razors are on display at the Procter & Gamble booth before CES International, Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)center_img Hansjoerg Reick looks at a display of Oral-B Genius X smart toothbrushes at the Procter & Gamble booth before CES International, Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher) 1 of 8 John Deere has hauled in a self-driving tractor aided by cameras with computer-vision technology to track the self-driving precision and program the route to be driven, shown at CES International Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) LAS VEGAS | The companies founded by blacksmith John Deere and candle-and-soap-making duo Procter & Gamble may not be the hip purveyors of new technology they were in 1837.But they’re first-time exhibitors at this year’s CES gadget show, along with other unlikely newcomers such as missile-maker Raytheon, outdoorsy retailer The North Face and the 115-year-old motorcycling icon Harley-Davidson.The four-day consumer-electronics show opens Tuesday with some 4,500 companies exhibiting products and services and more than 180,000 people expected to attend. It’s the place startups and established tech giants alike go to unveil everything from utilitarian apps to splashy devices.So what are these legacy companies doing here?“Every company today is a technology company,” said Gary Shapiro, CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, which organizes CES.Shapiro said many companies already send executives to Las Vegas each January to gauge trends, so it’s not surprising that they eventually unveil their own new technology as well.It’s also part of a more fundamental economic shift as consumers increasingly expect to buy not just goods and services, but a personal experience, which often skews digital, said Dipanjan Chatterjee, a brand analyst at Forrester Research.“We’re still doing old-fashioned things: Ordering clothes, buying detergent, getting a cup of coffee, but there are new-fangled ways of doing it,” he said. “Brands have no choice but to play a role in this new technology space.”That’s one reason Harley-Davidson is using the show to announce the commercial launch of its first electric motorcycle LiveWire. The motorcycle will have a cellular connection, as many cars do these days, so people can keep track of their motorcycle’s charge or check where they parked it through an app.Consumer goods giant P&G, best known for Pampers diapers and Tide detergent, is showcasing heated razors, a toothbrush with artificial intelligence and a wand-like device that scans the skin and releases serum to cover up age spots and other discoloration.P&G is also showing off an internet-connected scalp adviser: The Head & Shoulders-branded device uses ultraviolet light and other techniques to uncover scalp issues and recommend products. The device is available only in Europe and Asia for now.Expect these gizmos to cost more than the plain-old “dumb” versions. P&G’s Oral-B toothbrush, for example, is expected to cost $279, while a regular Oral-B electric toothbrush can be had for less than $30.And every new connected device means more data collection about people’s personal habits — a gold mine for advertisers and hackers alike.The North Face is using virtual reality to provide a fine-grained look at its waterproof fabrics.Raytheon is demonstrating the everyday applications of GPS anti-jam technology, which was originally designed to protect military forces.And John Deere has hauled in self-driving tractors and a 20-ton combine harvester aided by artificial intelligence. The combine has cameras with computer-vision technology to track the quality of grain coming into the machine so that its kernel-separating settings can be adjusted automatically. Farmers can monitor it remotely using a smartphone app.It’s hard to imagine what 19th century Illinois blacksmith John Deere might think if he were plopped into his company’s 2019 booth at the flashy Vegas convention center, but Deanna Kovar believes he’d be “amazed and astonished.”“His innovation was making a self-powering steel plow that could cut through the heavy, rich soils of the Midwest,” said Kovar, the company’s director of production and precision agriculture marketing. “We’ve been a technology company since the start.”Kovar said American farmers have been using self-driving tractors for decades — and CES is a chance to let everyone else know.Chatterjee said such messages are directed not just at a company’s customers, but to investors, potential corporate partners, startup acquisition targets and the technically skilled employees these more traditional firms are hoping to attract.“These are brands that are aggressively looking to work tech into their DNA,” Chatterjee said. “They want to be perceived all around as a tech-forward innovative brand.”AP video journalist James Brooks contributed to this report.last_img read more