Charles wants more indigents on PATH

first_imgRelatedCharles wants more indigents on PATH RelatedCharles wants more indigents on PATH Charles wants more indigents on PATH LabourMay 5, 2011 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail KINGSTON — Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon Pearnel Charles, wants more needy persons, not currently accessing any benefits under the Programme of Advancement through Health and Education (PATH), to join the programme. He has also urged persons and organizations aware of individuals needing assistance, to bring their situation to the attention of the Ministry. Currently, over 371,000 persons are registered under PATH, the country’s main poverty alleviation programme. The Minister made the appeals while addressing the official opening of the Ministry’s Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Public Assistance Office, at 108 Harbour Street, downtown Kingston, on Tuesday. Noting that Jamaica, like other nations, globally, was experiencing a range of challenges, Mr. Charles said it was imperative to use available resources “to the best of our ability”, to survive. He said PATH was the Government’s response to persons impacted by challenges consequent on global economic developments, among other things.     “The Government has strongly stated that…if you are poor, unemployed (and if there are) young children unable to go to school, we invite you, today, to visit one of our parish offices. If you are qualified, come aboard, we will help you,” he said. “We are (also) saying, to the pastors…community members, teachers, politicians, people who have organized groups, look among (your members and associates) and if there are vulnerable people, poor people who are qualified, we invite you to visit the Ministry of Labour office, give them (the) name (and) address. We will visit (and), we will inspect (their) situation, and, if (they) fall within the rank set out by the programme, (they) will receive assistance,” he assured. Mr. Charles also encouraged the Ministry’s staff administering the benefits, to exercise patience and courtesy when attending to the public, and commended them for the good work they have been doing since the programme started. The Ministry’s new Kingston and St. Andrew Public Assistance Parish Office, situated opposite the Taxpayer Audit and Assessment Department’s Stamp Duty and Transfer Tax division, was acquired and refurbished by the National Insurance Fund (NIF) at a cost of over $15 million. The NIF has rented the office space to the Ministry, to administer and deliver a range of public assistance programmes and benefits to some 48,000 PATH households. These include: emergency grants for victims of disasters; rehabilitation grants for persons in need; compassionate grants for assistance with funerals; and counselling services. The Ministry received some US$80,000, allocated from a US$15 million loan, which the Government secured from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) in 2009 to assist with social protection, in the face of the food price and protection crisis. The funds were channelled into strengthening the Ministry’s institutional framework, which include the installation of networking capability and procurement of furniture for the parish office. By DOUGLAS McINTOSH, JIS Reporter RelatedCharles wants more indigents on PATH Advertisementslast_img read more

Body found on roadside believed to be abducted 2-year-old girl: Police

first_imgMilwaukee Police(MILWAUKEE) — A child’s body wrapped in a blanket and found on the side of a road in Minnesota is believed to be that of Noelani Robinson, a 2-year-old girl for whom an Amber Alert was issued on Monday and whose father allegedly shot and killed her mother in Milwaukee on that same day.The body was discovered at around 7 p.m. on Friday night by a state Department of Public Works employee who was driving home, Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales said during a press conference Saturday morning.“He called this tip into the local police department … and just off the shoulder was a blanket and wrapped in there was the body of a child. We believe it is that of Noelani,” he said.Noelani was allegedly abducted on Monday by her father, Dariaz Higgins, 34, after he allegedly shot and killed her mother, Sierra Robinson, 24, that afternoon.Robinson was found lying on the driveway outside an apartment building, according to police, who said that she had been shot multiple times and pronounced dead at the scene.Morales said on Saturday that there would be an investigation into the death of the child, who was found 15 miles north of Austin, Minnesota, which is about 300 miles west of Milwaukee. First, however, there would have to be an autopsy.“What we can tell is we believe this death did not occur within the last 24 hours,” Morales said. “She had been there for quite some time, which is consistent with the suspect’s time when he was in that area in Minnesota.”Higgins was arrested by officers from the Milwaukee Police Department on Wednesday, department officials said in a statement. A second unnamed person was arrested with Higgins for “harboring and aiding a fugitive,” police said.Morales said that an investigation will determine “where we proceed … the types of charges we will be seeking.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.,Milwaukee Police(MILWAUKEE) — A child’s body wrapped in a blanket and found on the side of a road in Minnesota is believed to be that of Noelani Robinson, a 2-year-old girl for whom an Amber Alert was issued on Monday and whose father allegedly shot and killed her mother in Milwaukee on that same day.The body was discovered at around 7 p.m. on Friday night by a state Department of Public Works employee who was driving home, Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales said during a press conference Saturday morning.“He called this tip into the local police department … and just off the shoulder was a blanket and wrapped in there was the body of a child. We believe it is that of Noelani,” he said.Noelani was allegedly abducted on Monday by her father, Dariaz Higgins, 34, after he allegedly shot and killed her mother, Sierra Robinson, 24, that afternoon.Robinson was found lying on the driveway outside an apartment building, according to police, who said that she had been shot multiple times and pronounced dead at the scene.Morales said on Saturday that there would be an investigation into the death of the child, who was found 15 miles north of Austin, Minnesota, which is about 300 miles west of Milwaukee. First, however, there would have to be an autopsy.“What we can tell is we believe this death did not occur within the last 24 hours,” Morales said. “She had been there for quite some time, which is consistent with the suspect’s time when he was in that area in Minnesota.”Higgins was arrested by officers from the Milwaukee Police Department on Wednesday, department officials said in a statement. A second unnamed person was arrested with Higgins for “harboring and aiding a fugitive,” police said.Morales said that an investigation will determine “where we proceed … the types of charges we will be seeking.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Worst-Case Scenario

first_imgThe nexus is a communications system that has seen important enhancements since Sept. 11. Staffers watching the disasters unfold in New York and Washington that day began to poll Maryland hospitals, via voice and fax channels, to see if they were ready for more mass casualties in the region. The volume of communications soon choked the system. If local departments are overwhelmed, the state agencies can call in more ambulances, rescue teams, police and fire fighters under an interstate aid agreement. “I believe emergency planning is a never-ending loop,” Bass said. “There’s always a bigger ‘what if.’ I think we do well. As their counterparts elsewhere cope with earthquakes and tornadoes, the Marylanders charged with planning for the unimaginable say the state’s emergency response infrastructure, communications networks, first-responders and hospitals are much improved since the events of Sept. 11, 2001. Although ER crowding and the resulting diversion of ambulances away from the nearest hospital remain a problem here, data released last summer suggested it’s no longer getting worse, at least in Baltimore. That is not the case nationally, said Emory University’s Kellermann. “We weren’t as prepared as we thought we were,” said Susan K. Dohony, vice president for performance improvement at Calvert Memorial Hospital in Prince Frederick. “What do you do when profoundly more people need health care than we can provide? … We’ve never had to face that,” said Dr. Robert R. Bass, executive director of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services, which manages statewide emergency medical services day-to-day. MIEMSS is also working with the state on a new, statewide communication system using 700 MHz frequencies that TV broadcasters will vacate next year when they switch to digital transmissions. The challenge would be far greater if the disaster struck during an outbreak of seasonal flu. “We might not have any ICU [intensive care] beds in Baltimore,” Bass said. Plain hospital beds might be scarce, too. Dallas told the committee that we “only have a fraction of the potential health care and security personnel that we’ll need. A lot of people … will be on their own in the first 24 hours. There won’t be anyone there to help them.” Franklin Square Hospital, in eastern Baltimore County, has focused on catastrophes that could arise from nearby interstate highways, the Amtrak rail corridor, Baltimore’s chemical plants or the Aberdeen Proving Ground. JEMS.com Editor’s Note: How does your system compare to the one in Maryland? Read this story and comment below. Outside experts largely agree. The list of calamities that could send hundreds of casualties to Maryland hospitals is limited only by the human imagination. “Maryland has long been regarded as probably the exemplar in the country for understanding, valuing and organizing emergency medical services … and, very significantly, the state has not backed off from that commitment,” said Dr. Arthur L. Kellerman, associate dean for health policy at the Emory University School of Medicine. Mass burn casualties from, say, a plane crash or a terrorist’s bomb are another worry, Bass said. Improved fire safety engineering has reduced the number of burn cases, but also the number of available burn unit beds. Since then MIEMMS has developed and deployed an all-digital, Web-based network called “Facility Resources Emergency Database,” or FRED. Today, controllers can poll every hospital in the state for readiness and occupancy in 90 minutes, compared to the 24 hours the task once required. “Decontamination equipment, and personal protective equipment for our staff is key,” said Christine Hughes, the hospital’s emergency preparedness coordinator. Coupled with a statewide network of microwave towers and computer-controlled “trunking” technologies, Bass said, the new channels will allow Maryland to link the incompatible radio systems used by law enforcement, fire departments, hospitals, public health services, public works and highway crews. Franklin Squareis considering additional negative pressure and decontamination capacity a new patient-care tower scheduled for completion in 2010, Hughes said. It also has portable equipment available to convert existing space to such purposes. MIEMSS can alert emergency rooms to incoming ambulances or helicopters, or warn hospitals and health departments of emerging threats, from flu to tainted heroin. “The amount of information, and the number of folks we can send out to, went up exponentially,” Bass said. “But … you can’t have a plan for everything. You try to identify the most likely scenarios, and plan for those.”[email protected] “By and large … hospitals are in an aggressive state of denial about access to emergency care, crowding and diversions,” he said. Meanwhile, local disaster planners and hospitals are bringing emergency operations into conformity with state and federal guidelines. If a high-rise building collapses in downtown Baltimore, city police and firefighters would establish a command structure at the scene, while MIEMSS would instruct hospitals to launch their emergency plans. Maryland pioneered the system in the late 1960s. The state has tested, improved and used it every day since then, Bass said. “You have to be able to function well day-to-day to be able to ramp up when something bad happens.”center_img Maryland’s safety net is a complex web of state, county and local agencies, hospitals, private companies and nonprofits. Bass’ agency — known as MIEMSS – plays a central role. Staff in its downtown Baltimore control center already gather information from incident scenes and waiting hospitals, then coordinate the dispatch and destinations of ambulances and MedEvac helicopters. The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene would open its command center on West Preston Street. Its job might include ensuring sufficient cold storage for bodies and mental health support for firstresponders as well as vaccines, respirators, power and water for hospitals. “Candidly, that is one of our Achilles heels,” he said. At the same time, the Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) would activate its Emergency Operations Center in Reisterstown, providing a central location for state and local agencies, utilities and the Red Cross. MEMA could also manage the acquisition of cranes, bulldozers and other heavy equipment needed to deal with wreckage. The department also is continuing to enroll and train doctors, nurses, pharmacists, radiologists and other providers for the state’s Medical Resources Corps, which would deploy full-time, part-time, retired, or on-leave personnel as needed. The federal government has insisted that hospitals throughout the United States re-evaluate and address their vulnerabilities in the wake of Sept. 11. Infectious isolation rooms and burn-unit beds are not abundant here. And radiation decontamination facilities are slow. All could quickly be overwhelmed by a major disaster. BALTIMORE– A bomb explodes. An airliner crashes. Fire engulfs an office tower. “A lot of those patients might have to be distributed to other [more distant] burn centers,” he said. Hospitals without burn units might be asked to improvise space for burn care. The hospital has stockpiled radiation detectors and drugs and improved training. The first drill with the new decontamination room was held in December. “You empty the beds that you can” and prepare to expand treatment areas into hallways, cafeterias and even nearby schools if necessary, said Frank Monius, assistant vice president for administration at the Maryland Hospital Association.. Last fall, Calvert Memorial completed renovations to its emergency department, including a dedicated entrance where people injured in a nuclear accident at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant can be decontaminated before treatment. Even so, he said, “we’ve got to continue to look at scenarios and at how to improve things, and we’ve got to do that every day.” But worrisome vulnerabilities remain, they concede. A radioactive “dirty bomb,” a bioterrorist attack or even an outbreak of pandemic flu would add huge numbers and complexity to the management of our worst nightmares. “We needed more information, more quickly, about what their status was, and they wanted more information about what was going on, and what was expected from them,” Bass recalled. Another is crowded emergency rooms that back up regularly under normal conditions because there are too few beds available to receive patients admitted through the ER. Cham E. Dallas, director of the Institute for Health Management and Mass Destruction Defense at the University of Georgia, told the committee that such a blast near the White House would kill 100,000 people, seriously injure and burn another 150,000, and put 100,000 in immediate need of decontamination. Of course, a truly cataclysmic event, such as the detonation of a small nuclear device as envisioned in recent testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security, would likely overwhelm state and local plans and demand a federally-led response. Short of a calamity on that scale, Maryland’s disaster planners say their plans are flexible enough to deal with the most likely events the future may throw at them. Disaster planners acknowledge they still face vulnerabilities. For example, Bass worries about the limited capacity of negative-pressure isolation rooms, designed to prevent the escape of toxic or infectious agents. When disaster strikes, hospitals may have to convert space inside the hospital or in nearby schools or hotels to provide patient care. Some people may be have to be cared for at home. That does not minimize the state’s challenge, Bass said. “A mass-casualty, major incident is a scary deal. But in terms of our ability to handle it, I feel comfortable. We’re probably as prepared as any state, and I would argue better than a whole lot of others.” “In the span of a day, we could activate 500 ambulances,” Bass said. Volunteer medical teams mobilized under the National Disaster Medical System could be transported to Baltimore with their equipment within 48 to 72 hours.last_img read more

Statements versus e-Statements

first_imgby. Jennifer AndersonHow did you receive your account statements this month? What about your credit card statement? Credit unions are minimizing costs by electing to produce e-Statements rather than printed statements for members. Many accounts are being set up with e-Statements as a default and now require a member to opt-in for a paper statement or opt-out of the e-Statements. If your credit union’s primary means of delivering statements to your members is via e-Statements, how are your members consenting to receive them? How are you ensuring they have access to the statements? How do you know if they are reading the disclosures enclosed in the statement?First, have you reviewed the requirements under the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce (E-SIGN) Act, (15 U.S.C. 7001)? Section 7001(c) outlines the requirements that should be followed to ensure your member properly consents to receive electronic records (e-Statements and/or other documents in your agreement with the member).Prior to obtaining a members consent to receive electronic records a credit union must inform the member of any right or option to receive the record on paper or non-electronic form (if a non-electronic option is not available a relationship may not be formed) and the members right to withdraw consent to have the records provided electronically and any conditions, consequences (including relationship termination), or any fees that may result from the withdrawal of such consent. In addition, if the member must use specific procedures to withdraw consent or update electronic contact information this should be described in detail to the member prior to obtaining their consent.A credit union shall also provide the member with a statement of the required hardware and software required in order to access and retain the electronic records, prior to obtaining the members consent. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more