The government must resist micro-managing our EU exit

first_imgMonday 10 December 2018 9:06 pm City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. Tags: Brexit People Theresa May A no-deal Brexit would be a near-term negative supply shock, like the disruption caused by sustained adverse weather. Delays naturally drive up shipping prices, in turn raising prices of shipped goods while changing relative prices between them.These rising costs are, of course, not good for the economy. But markets are remarkably adept and self-correcting, helping to alleviate queuing and shortages.Firms which ship goods would have to reassess their willingness to pay. That helps ration space towards producers which judge that they can still profitably reach market.Similar decisions are made at the individual level. A rise in the price of imported Spanish tomatoes, for example, may shift demand and encourage consumers to buy more British carrots.But, dynamically, higher shipping prices also incentivise more ferries or container ships to serve the UK market, using ports where capacity is available. There may be practical difficulties to changing routes, and questions of the suitability of ports (some are designed for load-on, load-off container ships rather than roll-on, roll-off ferries). But one could envisage new trade routes into other ports such as Hull, Liverpool, Ramsgate, Immingham, and Sheerness.In time, producers might also adjust product ingredients so that they are less perishable in the face of some longer journeys. Other sellers might be encouraged, at the margin, to transport goods by air or train, or relocate activity to the UK.Government planning of which goods should get carried on ships distorts these adjustments. It also encourages special pleading.What starts with guarantees on medicines and water chemicals would soon see a plethora of industries lobbying for privileges. Ministries would be under pressure to grant favours to everyone from the car industry to food suppliers.This could harm competition too: large firms would be better positioned to make these demands than their smaller rivals.Already, ministers muse patronisingly about deciding between space for French paté or German gearboxes. But consumers and producers should determine priorities, not ministers. The government wading in is guaranteed to ensure shortages of some highly-demanded products.Ministers must resist their interventionist urges. Yes, adjustment will be disruptive. It requires an active government to prepare. But markets respond quickly in the face of necessity.The government’s focus should not be on planning what trade occurs, but minimising trade barriers faced by all where it can. Ryan Bourne Opinion whatsapp whatsappcenter_img Some at HMRC envisage far less disruption than Downing Street’s apocalyptic tales, and Tim Morris, chief executive at the UK Major Ports Group, has rubbished the idea that “the Dover effect” will occur elsewhere. But it seems reasonable to expect an early impact.The government must therefore be clear on what environment for cross-border trade it envisages – not just on regulations (it has largely said that it will accept all EU goods as before), but on tariffs, and whether it will apply a tariff-free environment to all goods worldwide under WTO law.This move towards unilateral free trade would helpfully offset some of the economic costs of more trade barriers with the EU, mitigating the Brexit trade disruption which politicians and commentators seem to fear so greatly.Sadly, rather than focus on these big structural questions, politicians’ instincts lean towards micro-management. Despite Treasury efforts, ministers are already discussing rationing space on ferries to guarantee that “essentials” are shipped.Such hysterical attempts at central planning are misguided. Unlike many commentators, I believe that a no-deal Brexit still very possible.It is the default as the clock ticks, and parliament must vote for government-backed legislation to change path. The government must resist micro-managing our EU exit Share For all the threats about a second referendum, the Conservatives would implode if they rowed back on delivering Brexit. And as regrettable as a no-deal scenario might be, it seems the only way of achieving a meaningful Brexit.But Brexiteers who consider this option the best path forward should admit that it would come with short-term dislocation, and prepare the country for it.The effect here would not be “uncertainty”. No-deal provides clarity relative to the chaos of Theresa May’s proposed withdrawal agreement or a second referendum.Rather, the impact would be practical disruptions as we shift towards a new trading environment.The visible effect widely discussed is at ports. Critics argue that delays caused by physical customs, administration, and regulatory checks will slow down the rate of vehicle pass-through. This could cause ferry and ship delays, in effect reducing capacity, mainly between Dover and Calais. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldTotal PastJohn Wick Stuntman Reveals The Truth About Keanu ReevesTotal PastMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailNoteableyFaith Hill’s Daughter Is Probably The Prettiest Woman In The WorldNoteableymoneycougar.comDiana’s Butler Reveals Why Harry Really Married Meghanmoneycougar.cominvesting.comThe Military Spent $1 Billion On this New Vehicle, And Here’s The First Lookinvesting.combonvoyaged.comTotal Jerks: These Stars Are Horrible People.bonvoyaged.com last_img read more

UK economy to take three years to recover from virus, say analysts

first_imgHowever, EY said things could be “significantly” worse than this forecast “if coronavirus affects the economy longer than expected”.  Share The economy is predicted to recover strongly in 2021. But this would not be enough to make up the lost ground, the report said. The UK economy is not expected to return to its fourth quarter of 2019 size until 2023. Show Comments ▼ Once-busy commercial areas have been deserted during the coronavirus lockdown (Getty Images) It added that there is still great uncertainty about whether large numbers of companies will go under and jobs will be lost. EY said this could hold back the recovery. The OBR said the economy could quickly bounce back. But Bank of England governor Andrew Bailey has struck a more pessimistic tone, suggesting there could be some “scarring” from the coronavirus pandemic. “The largest quarter on quarter contraction suffered during the 2008/9 financial crisis was 2.1 per cent in the fourth quarter of 2008,” he said. More From Our Partners Matt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who returns to work today after being hospitalised with Covid-19, has urged caution and wants to avoid a second wave of infections. However, “hawks” such as chancellor Rishi Sunak are more keen to ease lockdown measures in an effort to revive the economy. This is largely driven by consumer spending – a key driver of the economy – contracting by 14 per cent. EY Item Club’s prediction said that if some lockdown restrictions are eased in May and more in June, the UK economy will shrink by close to seven per cent in 2020. Unemployment will rise to 6.8 per cent from around four per cent in three months to February. Once-busy commercial areas have been deserted during the coronavirus lockdown (Getty Images) Also Read: UK economy will take three years to recover from coronavirus, say analysts Once-busy commercial areas have been deserted during the coronavirus lockdown (Getty Images) Also Read: UK economy will take three years to recover from coronavirus, say analysts whatsappcenter_img Harry Robertson The report from economics forecaster EY Item Club said UK GDP would likely shrink 6.8 per cent in 2020 and unemployment would surge to 6.8 per cent. Yet it said if the economy was gradually reopened from next month then it could rebound with growth of 4.5 per cent in 2021. It comes as the UK government debates when to reopen the economy, which has been effectively shut down since the end of March. Monday 27 April 2020 12:45 am Business investment, another key driver of the economy that has suffered in recent years amid Brexit uncertainty, is expected to plunge 13.6 per cent in 2020. It will rebound mildly to 1.2 per cent in 2021 and 6.5 per cent in 2022, EY Item Club said. whatsapp The UK economy could take three years to return to its 2019 size after the coronavirus pandemic has passed, a new report has warned, as consumer spending and business investment plunge. Once-busy commercial areas have been deserted during the coronavirus lockdown (Getty Images) Also Read: UK economy will take three years to recover from coronavirus, say analysts The prediction is more optimistic than some other groups have suggested, however. The UK Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) has laid out a “scenario” in which GDP plunges 35 per cent in the second quarter and 13 per cent in 2020 overall. UK economy will take three years to recover from coronavirus, say analysts The report praised government interventions, saying the unprecedented fiscal and monetary stimulus “should provide serious support to activity once the coronavirus impact starts to wane”. Yet it said that even with these policies in place, the outlook for the UK economy is dire. Howard Archer, chief economic advisor to the EY Item Club said GDP could fall by 13 per cent in the second quarter.last_img read more

Canary Wharf may move into Zone 1 in Transport for London higher fare plan

first_imgIn the transport body’s financial sustainability plan published this morning London mayor Sadiq Khan outlined measures to move the east London financial hub out of Zone 2, “reflecting change in London geography”. TfL said the extension of travel Zone 1 to Canary Wharf could raise £25m for the authority (Photo: Getty) (Getty Images) Also Read: Canary Wharf could move into Zone 1 in new Transport for London plan to raise fares Pay-as-you-go tube journeys in Zones 1 to 6 will increase by 10p or 20p, while travel card prices and journey caps will increase 2.6 per cent. A single bus and tram fare will increase by 5p to £1.55 and the daily cap has been hiked by 15p to £4.65. TfL said the extension of travel Zone 1 to Canary Wharf could raise £25m for the authority (Photo: Getty) (Getty Images) Also Read: Canary Wharf could move into Zone 1 in new Transport for London plan to raise fares whatsapp Saturday 16 January 2021 3:24 pm Tags: Transport for London More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.com Show Comments ▼ The proposal for Canary Wharf comes as Khan revealed plans to hike tube and bus ticket costs as part of TfL’s funding deal with central government agreed in October last year, ending five years of frozen fares. The “Hopper” fare will continue to allow passengers to access unlimited bus and tram travel within an hour for the price of a single journey.center_img Khan said: “Public transport should be affordable to all, so I am pleased that I was able to fight off even worse Government proposals to scrap free travel for under 18’s and concessions for over 60’s as well as bigger fares increase.” whatsapp Jessica Clark Transport for London (TfL) is considering moving Canary Wharf station into Zone 1 as it seeks to repair its Covid-decimated finances, in a move that could land commuters with a heftier bill when offices reopen. TfL said the move could generate around £25m beyond 2021/22 as fares in and to Zone 1 are more expensive than outer London travel areas.  Share Khan was required to increase fares under his control to deliver an overall rise of 2.6 per cent. Canary Wharf could move into Zone 1 in new Transport for London plan to raise fares TfL said the extension of travel Zone 1 to Canary Wharf could raise £25m for the authority (Photo: Getty) (Getty Images) last_img read more

Health department’s Covid response was an ‘absolute total disaster’, says Dominic Cummings

first_img“Obviously last year we saw that the Department for Health had an absolute total disaster in terms of buying — how it buys, how it procures, how it deals with science and technology,” Cummings said. “It’s why we had to take the vaccine process out of the Department for Health.” Health department’s Covid response was an ‘absolute total disaster’, says Dominic Cummings whatsapp Poppy Wood Cummings made the comments as part of an explosive evidence session to the House of Commons’ science and technology committee, marking his first public remarks since his dramatic departure from Number 10 last year. whatsapp Dominic Cummings outside his London home (Getty Images) Also Read: Health department’s Covid response was an ‘absolute total disaster’, says Dominic Cummings Speaking at the committee this morning, Cummings also revealed that the UK’s vaccines programme had to be moved out of the Department of Health and Social Care’s remit following problems with buying PPE for NHS staff. “In February, March, April last year, there was no entity in the British state – zero entities, including the prime minister himself – who could make rapid decisions on science funding minus horrific EU procurement, state aid etc, etc laws,” he said. Dominic Cummings outside his London home (Getty Images) It comes after the High Court ruled last month that the government acted unlawfully by failing to disclosed details of its Covid contracts in the initial outbreak of the pandemic. The government was also accused of handing out contracts to close contacts of government ministers and failing to advertise the huge tenders.   Dominic Cummings outside his London home (Getty Images) Also Read: Health department’s Covid response was an ‘absolute total disaster’, says Dominic Cummings Cummings was accused in court of awarding a contract to Public First, a company owned and run by two of his associates. The research firm was paid over half a million pounds to research the public’s understanding of the coronavirus. Wednesday 17 March 2021 1:20 pm Show Comments ▼ “It’s not coincidental the vaccine programme worked the way that it did,” he said. “We had to take it out of the Department for Health, we had to have it authorised very directly by the prime minister and say strip away all the normal nonsense.” “No entity in the British state that could operate at scale and at pace and that was obviously disastrous.” The health department’s initial response in the early days of the Covid pandemic was an “absolute total disaster”, Dominic Cummings has told MPs. Share Cummings, who masterminded the Vote Leave campaign during the EU referendum, told the committee that “one of the most obvious lessons” of the Covid crisis was the government should “go to extreme lengths to try to de-bureaucratise the normal system”. The Prime Minister’s former chief aide added that the health department was a “smoking ruin in terms of procurement and PPE”. Tags: Coronavirus Dominic Cummings Re-lockdown Test and Trace Vaccinelast_img read more

Laois Gaels and DCU to deliver webinar on combining college life with sport

first_img Facebook Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival TAGSDCULaois Gaels By Alan Hartnett – 29th March 2021 Twitter Laois Gaels, Laois Coaching and Games and DCU are teaming up to provide a webinar this evening.The focus of the webinar, which gets underway at 6pm, will be about combining college life with sport.The presentation will centre on what DCU has to offer current sixth year students, including those who are on county panels, that are currently thinking of their third level options.Former Laois footballer David Sweeney, who works in DCU Sport & Wellbeing, will give the presentation.While Laois Gaels Chairman Bryan Breen will also address the meeting.Former Laois footballer Leo Turley, a member of Laois Gaels committee, spoke about the webinar on the Talking Sport Podcast with LaoisToday recently.He said: “David is going to be doing this webinar based on young people and explaining how college and GAA are blended together.“This is being run by Laois Gaels and Laois Games Development in conjunction with DCU.“This is aimed at young people from 16 to 19 who are interested in going to college and it may give them some pointers on what to do.”Anyone interested in joining the webinar can do so here.you can listen to the latest episode on Soundcloud below or by subscribing on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.The LaoisToday Podcast · Talking Sport Podcast: Leo Turley on Laois memories, management and Laois GaelsSEE ALSO – Catch up on our latest Talking Sport Podcasts here Home Sport GAA Laois Gaels and DCU to deliver webinar on combining college life with… SportGAA Pinterest Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Laois Gaels and DCU to deliver webinar on combining college life with sport Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleDeaths in Laois – Monday, March 29, 2021Next articleYoung hurlers also to be catered for under new Laois GAA athletic development plan Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Electric Picnic Pinterest Council Facebook Electric Picnic WhatsApplast_img read more

Percy Junor Hospital to Benefit from Fundraising Effort of Manchester Group

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedPercy Junor Hospital to Benefit from Fundraising Effort of Manchester Group RelatedPercy Junor Hospital to Benefit from Fundraising Effort of Manchester Group RelatedPercy Junor Hospital to Benefit from Fundraising Effort of Manchester Groupcenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Manchester Wellness Foundation (MANWELL), a non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Mandeville, is seeking to raise $1.2 million for the purchase of a ventilator for the Percy Junor Hospital.One of the main fundraising events will be a wellness festival from August 25 to 27.The festival will get underway at 10:00 a.m. on August 25, with a health fair at the Mandeville town centre. Dr. Anthony Vendryes, specialist in alternative medicine, is the patron for the event.On Saturday, there will be a dinner and cabaret at the historic Manchester Club with an all day golf tournament closing off proceedings on Sunday.Persons or groups interested in taking part in the activities can make contact MANWELL at (876) 964-6460 or email: [email protected] Percy Junor Hospital to Benefit from Fundraising Effort of Manchester Group UncategorizedAugust 17, 2006last_img read more

“You can’t make malaria wait”: Hidden risks in COVID-19 foreign aid

first_img“You can’t make malaria wait”: Hidden risks in COVID-19 foreign aid You can’t make malaria wait while you deal with COVID19. Image from Htin Kyaw Thu, MyanmarThe global efforts against malaria have stalled and the situation is now precarious warns Professor Brendan Crabb AC in the Australian Financial Review.Read the entire article by AFR Health Editor, Jill Margo. An edited version is shared below.Australia needs to be careful that its generous pledge of almost AUD$1.2 billion to help fight COVID-19 in neighbouring countries does not fix one problem while overlooking other health challenges, experts warn.Just as the pandemic led to people shunning treatment for serious medical issues in Australia this year, there is also fear that endemic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV in the south Pacific and south-east Asia could take hold more seriously.“Malaria poses the most acute, short-term risk. It can double, triple or do worse in a single wet season if the wheels come off control measures,” Professor Brendan Crabb AC, Director and CEO of Burnet Institute said.“You can’t make malaria wait while you deal with COVID. It has probably killed between 10 and 30 per cent of all people who have ever lived. It is the greatest pandemic ever and is the reason countries in tropical regions of the world are so poor.“I’m full of praise for Australia’s contribution, in particular for the ministerial trio of Foreign Minister [Marise] Payne, International Development Minister [Alex] Hawke and Health Minister [Greg] Hunt, who secured this vast sum of money.“But it’s vital we ensure we strengthen services that control the pandemics already in those countries, by integrating them with the new COVID strategy.“We should aim to kill several birds with one stone.”Professor Crabb, a world authority on malaria, says remarkable progress in combating the disease has recently stalled and the three decades of hard-fought gains can rapidly be undone.“The situation is precarious,” he said, commenting on the World Malaria Report 2020, released by the World Health Organization.Progress stalledWhile COVID-19 has reinforced the critical importance of timely, accurate, localised data and innovation to fight malaria effectively, the report describes it as a “serious additional challenge to malaria responses”.It says the world has stalled at 1100 child deaths a day from malaria. While this is a big improvement from double that number a decade ago, the fact that every death is preventable underlines this tragedy.A recent report in The Lancet Infectious Diseases raised similar concerns saying it was urgent that policymakers not ignore measures to fight malaria when considering strategies to combat COVID-19.As fever is a common symptom in both diseases, education is needed so people do not mistake one for the other, although the two can co-occur.People needed to be tested for both and the report said it was important those with malaria were not scared to visit hospitals and community clinics in fear of misdiagnosis.Professor Crabb, who also chairs Pacific Friends of Global Health, attributes the stalling in malaria control to growing resistance to anti-malarial drugs, insecticides and even the diagnostic test.The government will reallocate $280 million in aid funding to deal with COVID-19 in the Asia-Pacific.“Our tools are becoming less reliable and we might be reaching the limit of what’s useful. But we must keep up malaria service delivery while we introduce COVID vaccine readiness programs.“To help our neighbours, Australia has given $300 million to the GAVI, the global vaccine alliance, and $80 million to Covax, a collection of agencies that also procures vaccines. Another $305 million was announced in the budget for the Pacific and Timor Leste, and just a few weeks ago, a further $500million was pledged.“The last thing we want is for our well-meaning focus on COVID to distract us from global health challenges that predated COVID.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, Burnet Institute, community, education, foreign minister, global health, Government, health minister, HIV, infectious disease, innovation, research, Timor, Timor Leste, tuberculosis, World Health Organizationlast_img read more

GFSL delivers on carbon reduction targets in English prisons

first_imgGFSL delivers on carbon reduction targets in English prisons Gov Facility Services Ltd (GFSL), has launched a project to upgrade the existing lighting in HMP Elmley to high efficiency LED fittings, saving the Ministry of Justice c£115, 000 and c183 tonnes of CO2 annually.This energy saving initiative is running alongside another project in which GFSL is working with the Ministry of Justice to install nearly c5,560 new cell light fittings across 20 sites by March 2021. This wider partnership project will reduce operating costs over the 20 sites by c£121,000 a year, saving c750,000 kWhrs and c168 tonnes of CO2.GFSL Energy Services Manager Stewart Grew explains:We are committed to reducing carbon emissions in the Southern England prisons and are proud to say that these 2 projects will reduce our carbon footprint by c351 tonnes of CO2 annually.GFSL CEO Paul Ryder adds:The lighting upgrade project at HMP Elmley is an important piece of work that shows how committed the MOJ and GFSL teams are towards meeting our carbon footprint targets in English prisons. This scheme will significantly reduce maintenance costs, and allow GFSL to dedicate more resources to improving conditions for residents.NotesGov Facility Services Limited (GFSL) is a Ministry of Justice owned not-for-profit company. Set up in 2018, we work closely with Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) to deliver a range of facility services to 48 prisons in the south of England, including statutory and mandatory planned maintenance, reactive repair, cleaning, stores operation and Project works. We also help the Prison Service reduce reoffending by providing opportunities for prisoners to develop skills and gain work experience. We currently support over a million hours per year of work by prisoners across the 48 prisons we maintain. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:carbon, carbon emissions, carbon footprint, efficiency, energy, English, Government, justice, operation, Prison, prisoners, project, resources, running, southern, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

Victoria To Further Relax COVIDSafe Settings

first_imgVictoria To Further Relax COVIDSafe Settings VIC PremierVictoria will further relax its COVIDSafe settings, allowing for more visitors in the home, reduced mask wearing and an increase in the number of people allowed in live music venues and other settings. Acting Premier James Merlino and Minister for Health Martin Foley announced today that following reduced exposure risk and low community transmission, new COVIDSafe settings would be implemented this week.From 6pm on Friday 26 March, masks will no longer be required in retail settings but Victorians will still need to carry one with them at all times and wear it on public transport, in rideshare vehicles and taxis and in sensitive settings such as aged care facilities and hospitals.Victorians will be able to host up to 100 people in their home per day. Outdoor gatherings in public places – the beach, the park – can also increase to 200 people.Density limits in venues still operating under more restrictive settings – like casinos, karaoke venues and nightclubs – will move from 1 person per 4sqm to 1 person per 2sqm. This is in line with cafes, pubs and restaurants.Additional people will also be allowed in indoor non-seated entertainment venues with an increase from 50 per cent to 75 per cent capacity however, the limit of 1000 people per space remains. Dancefloors will move to the same density limit of the venue and the 50 patron cap will also be removed.There will no longer be limits on class sizes for outdoor and indoor physical recreation or fitness classes – and unstaffed gyms will be moving from a density limit of 1 person to 8sqm to 1 person per 4sqm.In a boost for the economy, the 75 per cent cap on private and public offices workers will also be removed, which coincides with a revised flexible work policy for the Victorian Public Service (VPS) released today.While all workplaces are still required to ensure people can work from the office in a COVIDSafe way – with a density limit of 1 person per 2sqm – they will no longer be required to permit workers to work from home.In further good news for AFL fans and following a successful first round, crowds will now be able to increase to 75 per cent for Round 2.For more information on the new coronavirus settings visit coronavirus.com.auAs stated by Acting Premier James Merlino“We know the risk is far from over but thanks to the incredible work of all Victorians, we’re continuing to open up and see the Victoria we all love, return to life again.”“More Victorians back at work means more people supporting their local cafes, restaurants and live music venues – boosting the economy where it’s needed most.” As stated by Minister for Health Martin Foley“These changes are another positive step in Victoria’s social and economic recovery but also a reminder that now is not the time to be complacent – we must continue to keep each other safe, so we can stay open.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AFL, aged care, AusPol, Australia, beach, community, coronavirus, Economy, exposure, fitness, Government, health, masks, Minister, Premier, Public Service, public transport, Transport, Victorialast_img read more

Base Line Middle School Students To Get Awards For 'Copenhagen' Works In CU-Boulder-School-DCPA Program

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: May 29, 2003 Base Line Middle School students who participated in a cooperative program this spring to study the Tony-award winning play “Copenhagen” will receive awards for their play-based projects in a special ceremony at the school on June 3. The award ceremony for the students, and their teachers, will be at 1:30 p.m. at Base Line Middle School, 700 20th St. in Boulder. Student projects were in one of four categories including performance, 3-D art, visual art and writing. The students studied the play as part of a cooperative effort involving the school, the Denver Center for the Performing Arts and the Center for the Humanities and the Arts at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The play, which ran at the Denver Center Theatre Company from March 12 through May 10, features a conversation by physicists on the ethical and moral dilemmas surrounding the creation of the first nuclear bomb. The students read the play and went to the performance in mid-April after participating in a 90-minute class by three CU-Boulder doctoral students on the ideas and subjects of the play. The CU students incorporated theater, history and science into the class. “The judges for the Copenhagen projects said they were amazed at the variety of submissions and their creativity,” said Jeanne Manning, chair of the Advisory Council for the CU-Boulder Center for the Humanities and the Arts. The judges included Boulder Valley School Supt. George Garcia, Dean of CU-Boulder’s School of Education Lorrie Shepard, Jared Polis, of the state Board of Education and Deputy Director of Public Affairs Ken Santistevan of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts. Twelve of the participating eighth graders who received first- and second-place honors will receive monetary awards, and all of the winners will receive vouchers for two tickets to one of four plays being produced this summer by the Colorado Shakespeare Festival at CU-Boulder. First- and second-place winners include: Alana Richardson (first place, performance), Evan Kruegel (second place, performance), Ariel Heintze (first place, 3-D art), Rowena Lair, Steph Koppe and Mairead La Jeunesse (tied for second place, 3-D art), Urpi Parionai and Cammie Hensley (tied for first place, visual art), Erin Simons-Brown and Ana Nissan (first place, writing) and Will Steinhardt and Jon Endicott (second place, writing). Participating teachers who will receive gift certificates to the Boulder Book Store for their work on the project include Mary Jo Bode, Larry Runnels, Jill Gartland and Joni Kiesecker. Students receiving honorable mention for their projects include Allie Peterson, Lizzy Chitty, Matt Monohan, Jamie Langer, Danielle DesGeorge, Shanti Colol, Haley Ohl, Nicki Rzyska-Filipek, Caroline Andrews, Emily Cleveland, Claire Sarson, Lacy Bishop and Vivian Underhill. Editors: To arrange interviews or photographs at Base Line Middle School, please contact Mary Jo Bode at (303) 442-3580. For other questions contact Jeannine Malmsbury at (303) 492-3115 in the CU-Boulder News Services Office.last_img read more

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