Collision of Covid-19 and Brexit fuels a £700bn blow to economic output

first_imgThe UK economy has been forecast to suffer an over £700bn blow to output due to the collision of Covid-19 and Brexit, the National Institute of Economic and Social Research warned today. “Too little spending previously is likely to have contributed to 2020’s high Covid-19 mortality rates,” the think tank continued, detailing research that showed the UK to have some of the lowest numbers of hospital beds and doctors per person among wealthy nations. The bruising figure was made worse by the government’s “poor Covid-19 response”, the think tank said, adding that it has left the UK facing more permanent damage than other rich nations. whatsapp (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) Share The UK’s growth outlook has been looking slightly cheerier in recent weeks, after enduring the worst economic collapse in 300 years, thanks to the Covid-19 vaccination programme. However, improvements in public health prospects would bolster a recovery in consumer confidence and invite a strong rebound in economic activity this summer, NIESR said. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) Also Read: Collision of Covid-19 and Brexit fuels a £700bn blow to economic output Show Comments ▼ After a decade of austerity-driven cuts signed off by Conservative government’s had left the UK’s health and social care capacity in a “weak state”, the UK was already in a vulnerable position when the pandemic struck, the NIESR report said. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) Also Read: Collision of Covid-19 and Brexit fuels a £700bn blow to economic output Tags: Brexit Coronavirus Covid-19 a year on Economic austerity NHS (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) Also Read: Collision of Covid-19 and Brexit fuels a £700bn blow to economic output And with refugees with healthcare experience able to make their way into the NHS, at a price, there remains hope for the UK’s public health service after suffering an emergency at such a scale. Millie Turner However, it expects the economy to grow by 5.7 per cent this year and see pre-pandemic levels of recovery by the end of 2022. Collision of Covid-19 and Brexit fuels a £700bn blow to economic output The NIESR said the level of GDP was on track to be almost 4 per cent lower in 2025 than it would have been without the pandemic. This is equivalent to £1,350 per person a year. The think tank added that the collective loss of economic output would be worth £727bn in total over the five-year period. Tuesday 11 May 2021 10:14 am whatsapp Plunging by 9.8 per cent last year, the UK economy had the worst performance in the G7 amidst a string of lockdown delays and premature easing.   The forecast is a sharp upgrade from its previous estimate of 3.4 per cent but is significantly south of the Bank of England forecast of 7.25 per growth by the end of this year. Pandemic mishandling “While all countries have seen downgrades in their economic outlooks, those which have handled Covid-19 well are likely to find their long-term growth prospects downgraded by less,” the UK’s oldest independent economic research institute said.last_img read more

Florida has no plan for release of second COVID-19 vaccine dose as date approaches

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementBoth Pfizer and Moderna require two shots for the vaccine to fully work.David Silverberg also said he wants it but has been unsuccessful to receive it in either Collier or Lee counties.“You may as well get your first dose and see how things work out 28 days later,” Silverberg said. Two suffer shark bites off Florida beach June 16, 2021 AdvertisementTags: covid-19 vaccineFloridasecond dose Many are wondering about a second dose of the vaccine, as the state has no plan yet for people to receive the second shot they need.It’s quickly approaching 28 days since the first covid vaccines were administered in Florida, and some people who are relying on the second shot are asking if the state has a plan to administer it and how that will happen.Linda Kelly said she wants the shot along with her 95-year-old mother but doesn’t want it until she knows she can assuredly receive the necessary booster shot.“Neither one of us are comfortable with the current plan or no play. We’re not going to do it until we can be assured we will have it in the 28 days,” Kelly said. June 16, 2021 Advertisement Lee County COVID-19 vaccine site moving to North Fort Myers this month June 13, 2021center_img As of Monday, Lee County Commissioner Kevin Ruane confirmed there is no plan for folks to get that second shot.“The state certainly has indicated they’re working with the federal government and they’ll address this issue this week,” Ruane responded.Counties cannot hold back vaccines for use later.“We’re responsible for giving the vaccine out. That was the first thing we were instructed to do. We didn’t want to break protocol,” Ruane continued.Dr. Sue Hook with Samaritan Health and Wellness in Cape Coral said the fact the state doesn’t yet have a plan is concerning.Despite concerns, Hook is suggesting people still receive the first shot as soon as possible.“If you miss your booster shot a few days it’s not going to affect it. You’re still going to build those antibodies,” Hook said.Lee County is approaching 11,000 people who have been vaccinated so far and who are hoping the second shot will be there when they need it.“Now we’ve got [thousands of] people walking around without any insurance they’re going to receive the second vaccine. What does that do for our community?” asked Linda Kelly.Medical experts agreed the best advice is to take that first vaccine as soon as possible and hope the state has the plan in place by the time a second dose is needed. The governor’s office did not respond to NBC2’s question on when the plan may be available. Florida nursing homes report COVID-19 infection rates nearly double the national average Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Mobile pediatric clinic provides COVID vaccines for children 12+ June 15, 2021last_img read more

CMHC to stop insuring mortgages on million dollar homes

first_imgCanadian Press Brookfield Business Partners takes controlling stake in Genworth Canada Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. says it will no longer offer mortgage insurance for homes that cost $1 million or more, starting July 31, even if the buyer has made a deposit of 20 per cent or more. It’s a step further than rules introduced two years ago when then finance minister Jim Flaherty announced that CMHC would stop insuring mortgages on homes worth $1 million or more if the buyer borrowed more than 80 per cent of the value. Scheer promises help for homebuyers Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related newscenter_img The Crown corporation says the changes announced Friday would have affected only about three per cent of the mortgage insurance it provided last year for individual homes. CMHC also announced it will no longer insure loans that are used to finance construction of multi-unit condominium projects, effective immediately. It says that type of insurance product was introduced in 2010, but CMHC hasn’t provided any to builders since 2011. CMHC also says its mortgage loan insurance for condo buyers isn’t affected by the change. Keywords Mortgage insuranceCompanies Canada Mortgage & Housing Corp. New stress test unlikely to be a game-changer for homebuyers Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

CMI Delivering First-Class Training – Pickersgill

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of Housing, Transport, Water and Works, Robert Pickersgill, has said the Caribbean Maritime Institute (CMI) was making a significant contribution to the international shipping industry, through its consistent delivery of first-class training to regional seafarers.“The CMI . has extended its reach to the region and the wider international community. For the past two and a half decades, the Institute has been the only one of its kind in the region,” Mr. Pickersgill said, in a speech delivered by Senior Director of Policy, Planning and Evaluation in the Ministry, Elsa-May Binns, at the CMI graduation ceremony held yesterday (Sept. 28) at the Jamaica Conference Centre.The Minister, in his speech, informed that the Institute “has recently embarked on a thrust to increase its visibility in the island, and to this end, has signed a franchise agreement with the Montego Bay Community College for the delivery of the Associate of Applied Science degree in Industrial Systems Operation and Maintenance”.He said that “this will be of great assistance to students based in western Jamaica, who are seeking to pursue programmes in maritime studies offered at the Institute”.The Transport Minister pledged the government’s support in the advancement of the 26-year-old Institute, and informed that a Memorandum of Understanding had been signed with German-based Harren and Partners, to provide for the placement and employment of CMI graduates and cadets on company’s ships.The arrangements also allows for co-operation in a variety of areas such as professional development and exchange of skill.Meanwhile, in relating his recent experience with a CMI graduate, who had qualified at the Masters Degree level in Nautical Engineering, and was employed on a major supertanker plying the Pacific Rim, Minister Pickersgill told the graduates that greatness was within their grasp.The CMI has as its mandate, the provision of training for maritime professionals in the coast guard, shipping and allied industries.The institution has forged linkages with the World Maritime University in The Hague, University of the West Indies and University of Technology, and its associate degrees and diploma courses are approved by the University Council of Jamaica.A total of 107 students graduated from the Institute yesterday. CMI Delivering First-Class Training – Pickersgill UncategorizedSeptember 29, 2006 RelatedCMI Delivering First-Class Training – Pickersgill RelatedCMI Delivering First-Class Training – Pickersgillcenter_img RelatedCMI Delivering First-Class Training – Pickersgill Advertisementslast_img read more

Organisations Urged to Work With Official Representatives in Relief Effort

first_imgRelatedOrganisations Urged to Work With Official Representatives in Relief Effort FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail High Commissioner to Canada, Evadne Coye, has urged Jamaican organizations in Canada to collaborate with Jamaican official representatives to facilitate rapid response to the appeals from the country, in the aftermath of Hurricane Dean.“To ensure the most effective means of achieving our common objective, the various community organizations should collaborate with the Jamaican official representatives,” she emphasized.The official representatives are the High Commission in Ottawa, the Consulate General in Toronto, and Honorary Consuls located in Vancouver, British Columbia; Edmonton, Alberta; Winnipeg, Manitoba; and Montreal, Quebec.Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica are being encouraged to give monetary contributions as their way of assisting with the relief and reconstruction effort. However, High Commissioner Coye said that if a receipt is required for tax purposes, the official representatives are not authorized under Canadian law to issue it. In this case, she said, community associations with the appropriate tax registration as charitable institutions, should be the recipient of these donations, which should be clearly identified as ‘Hurricane Dean Fund.’Several accounts have been established in Ottawa and Toronto to accept monetary contributions from generous members of the public. Persons can also send cheques payable to the Jamaica High Commission in Ottawa or the Jamaican Consulate General in Toronto. The addresses are: Jamaica High Commission, 275 Slater Street, Suite 800 Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5H9 and the Jamaican Consulate General, 303 Eglinton Avenue, East Toronto, Ontario M4P 1L3.Accounts have been opened in Ottawa at: Royal Bank of Canada – HC for Jamaica – Jamaica National Disaster Relief, 99 Bank Street, Transit # 00236/Account # 101-472-9; and CIBC, Carlingwood Branch – National Institute of Jamaican Canadians Transit # 00206 / Account # 69-06915.In Toronto, accounts have been opened at: Bank of Montreal – The Consulate General of Jamaica, Transit # 2418 /Account # 8064-589; TD Canada Trust – Jamaican Hurricane Relief Fund Transit # 1020/Account # 0690-526-8137; Scotiabank – Jamaican Diaspora-Canada Disaster Relief Fund, Transit # 50062 / Account # 003-8318; Royal Bank – Jamaican Canadian Association Distress Relief Fund, Transit # 6702 / Account # 107-651-2.A Hurricane Emergency Relief Committee in Toronto, headed by Consul General Anne-Marie Bonner, has set up drop-off depots for needed items which have been identified by Jamaica’s Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM). These include tarpaulins, flashlights and batteries, hygiene kits, towels and washrags, inflatable mattresses and blankets.The items will be collected until September 7 and drop-off points are the Jamaican Canadian Association at 995 Arrow Road and Revivaltime Tabernacle, 4340 Dufferin Street (south of Finch) in Toronto.The High Commission will be organizing two fund-raising activities in Ottawa within the next two months. Details will be posted on the website at www.jhcottawa.ca once arrangements are in place. RelatedOrganisations Urged to Work With Official Representatives in Relief Effort Organisations Urged to Work With Official Representatives in Relief Effort UncategorizedAugust 24, 2007center_img RelatedOrganisations Urged to Work With Official Representatives in Relief Effort Advertisementslast_img read more

Develop Strategies to Teach ICT in Schools – Reid

first_imgDevelop Strategies to Teach ICT in Schools – Reid UncategorizedApril 8, 2008 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Special advisor to the Minister of Education, Ruel Reid, has underscored the need for emphasis on developing the requisite “instructional strategies” to enhance the teaching and learning of computer technology in schools.Speaking at the first E-Learning Jamaica (E-Ljam) teachers’ graduation ceremony at the Mico University College in Kingston on Friday (April 4),Mr. Reid, who represented Education Minister Andrew Holness, noted that as government “invested large sums of money towards outfitting classrooms with computer technology”, many educators “await the promise of technology’s power to guide them and to lead improvements in the educational system”.“Research, however, is inconclusive, as to the effect of computer technology on student achievement. As teachers respond to the challenge to utilize computer technology in the teaching and learning process, they must be mindful of an important distinction between using technology and infusing technology,” he stated.While acknowledging that teachers must be offered training in the use of computers, Mr. Reid said this must incorporate the instructional strategies needed to infuse technological skills in the learning process. In the same vein, he lamented what he described as “popular trends regarding technology use in schools” that threaten to “impede the transformation impact of technology in the instruction environment”. One of these, he pointed out, is an overemphasis on merely building teachers’ technology skills.“In the struggle to use and infuse technology, learning to use the computer is the easier part, and sometimes a challenge for many teachers. Yet knowing how to use a computer does little to guarantee the success and infusion of technology into the teaching and learning process,” the Special Advisor noted.Another trend, Mr. Reid said, is the belief that teachers’ inability to use technology could be overcome by students’ ability in this area.“Often, we hear administrators claiming that some teachers’ fear of computers will not be a problem because the students will teach one another and the teacher (how to use it). But, what self-respecting administrator would hire a teacher, who could not read and claim that it is not a problem because the students will teach the teacher?” he asked rhetorically.This belief, Mr. Reid further said, leads to a third “problematic” trend, where the computer is often regarded as an end in itself. He noted that in schools where the computer is deemed a tool, “upon closer observation, it is evident that the use of the computer is either the goal of the lesson or a convenient side product of the lesson.”“The emphasis is on teaching students merely to use the computer, not to consider it as a tool integral to the learning process. Computer technology provides students and teachers with unprecedented opportunities to transform the teaching and learning process,” he informed.Despite these challenges, Mr. Reid said an encouraging 61 per cent of teachers have indicated that they are computer literate, adding that, “I have challenged the Minister (that) in five year’s time, all teachers in Jamaica will be fully computer literate.”Some 334 teachers and lecturers from some 28 secondary institutions participated in the inaugural E-Ljam training programme, which is a joint effort between the Ministry of Energy, Mining, and Telecommunications, and the Ministry of Education.The project is aimed at using state of the art information and communications technology (ICT) to enhance the learning experience, thereby improving the quality of education in secondary schools. Advertisements RelatedDevelop Strategies to Teach ICT in Schools – Reidcenter_img RelatedDevelop Strategies to Teach ICT in Schools – Reid RelatedDevelop Strategies to Teach ICT in Schools – Reidlast_img read more

$50 million support package to help regional communities combat mouse plague

first_img$50 million support package to help regional communities combat mouse plague Deputy PremierThe NSW Government has today announced a $50 million package to offer farmers, households and small businesses assistance to battle the mice plague currently impacting parts of rural and regional NSW.Deputy Premier John Barilaro and Minister for Agriculture Adam Marshall said free baiting, through free-of-charge grain treatment, would be made available to primary producers, while affected rural and town households and small businesses would be able to apply for rebates to help them meet the cost of purchasing mouse baits.“We know the financial pressure this mice plague is putting on farmers and household budgets, we have heard the concerns of regional NSW and we are acting on it,” Mr Barilaro said.“The NSW Government will establish grain treatment facilities at specified locations across rural and regional NSW for farmers to have their grain treated free of charge and we will provide rebates to small businesses and households through Service NSW to help meet the cost of buying bait.“I am also forming an advisory committee to ensure everyone has access to expert advice, including the latest hot spots, health and food safety advice, information for vets and guidance for keeping children and animals safe.”Under this package households will be able to apply for rebates of up to $500 and small businesses will be eligible to claim up to $1,000 through Service NSW.The advisory committee will include representatives from the Department of Regional NSW, Local Land Services, Department of Primary Industries, NSW Health, Service NSW, NSW Food Authority, Office of Small Business Commissioner, the Office of Local Government and the CSIRO.Mr Marshall said farmers would be able to have their grain treated free of charge to protect their hard-sown crops from vermin.“Today’s announcement of free baits to treat grain almost completely removes the cost burden on our farmers and croppers and complements our popular workshops to arm farmers with the tools needed to build a mice-free fortress to protect their paddocks,” Mr Marshall said.“I’ve seen first-hand the impact these rodents are having. They are a scourge on our agricultural production so we are giving landholders a fearsome suite of tools to manage mice.“We’re making this as easy for farmers as we possibly can. No tedious rebate forms to fill out, just bring your grain to have the experts treat it free of charge.“Free bait is better than any rebate for our farmers, who we continue to stand behind post drought, bushfires and floods.”In addition to free grain treatment and expert workshops, the NSW Department of Primary Industries will also launch an unprecendented body of research to identify and potentially develop future tools to combat mice plagues, including biological controls.Fast facts:$500 rebates for eligible households$1,000 rebates for eligible small businessesFree mice bait (grain treatment) for farmersThe NSW Government has sought urgent approval from the Commonwealth’s APVMA for the use of bromadiolone in NSW Expanded workshops to educate farmers on the best eradication strategiesA moonshot research project to identify and potentially develop a new mice-killing agentFor the latest information about the mice plague, including information about eligibility, how rebates will be claimed as well as health advice at nsw.gov.au/mice /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Australia, Commissioner, commonwealth, CSIRO, food authority, Food Safety, Government, health, Local Government, Local Land Services, New South Wales, NSW, NSW Department of Primary Industries, NSW Health, production, Service NSW, Small Businesslast_img read more

Two men fined for poaching in Northumberland

first_imgTwo men fined for poaching in Northumberland David Moore, 30, of Staffen Court, Amble, and Adam Nyberg, 39, of Leslie Drive, Amble, were both charged with illegally fishing for salmon and sea trout with a gill net in the river Coquet near Amble.They pleaded guilty when they appeared at Newcastle Magistrates’ Court on Thursday, 20 May. They were both fined £500, ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £50, and the forfeiture and destruction of the net was ordered.Prosecuting for the Environment Agency, Matthew Treece told the court that on 29 July 2019 the Environment Agency received a report that two men had set a gill net across the River Coquet near Amble.Gill nets are designed to catch fish by their gills and are rarely licensed in rivers due to their indiscriminate nature and the fact the fish caught in the nets will usually suffocate and die.Fisheries officers attended and saw men matching their descriptions in the area. They kept watch of the river where the gill net had been set and using a thermal imager and night vision they saw the defendants by the side of the river, with one wading out towards where officers had been told the net was set.They were both arrested and the net was later recovered after it had come loose from the river bank. It had caught 14 fish – 12 sea trout and 2 salmon – 10 of which were dead.Gill nets ‘extremely damaging to fish stocks’Both defendants said they had been fishing to feed themselves and their families and had not given a great deal of thought about the consequences of their actions, although they admitted they had offended deliberately.Following the case, David Shears, Senior Fisheries Enforcement Officer for the Environment Agency in the North East, said:Gill nets such as the one used in this case are designed to catch fish by their gills and can be extremely damaging to fish stocks. Illegal fishing can have a devastating impact, particularly on migratory fish, while other wildlife can also get caught up in the nets.We’ll continue to act on information received and work closely with our partners and angling clubs, supported by the Angling Trust, to take action against those flouting the law. This case demonstrates that we do act on the information that is passed to us.To report illegal fishing call the 24-hour Incident Hotline on 0800 807060.Anyone interested in fishing can buy a fishing licence online /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:bank, court, deal, environment, fish:, Fisheries, fishing, Government, Impact, incident, law, licence, Moore, Newcastle, online, poaching, UK, UK Government, wildlifelast_img read more

Your student government: Living the Colorado Creed

first_img Published: Dec. 14, 2016 The past couple of weeks have been very turbulent for many of us Buffs, with the recent election, finals and other uncertainties that college students face. It is important for us as members of the CU Boulder community, to remember the Colorado Creed and reflect on how we can live our lives by its values.Created by students in 2004, the Creed embodies how we should engage with one another as students, faculty members, staff and as members of a larger Boulder community.Much like the pioneers who founded Boulder and helped establish what would become an internationally renowned research university, the students in 2004 saw a need, and worked to fulfill it. Since then, many other students have had the responsibility of continuing on the Colorado Creed for future generations of the CU and Boulder communities. We believe the Colorado Creed is not a rule or a mandate, but a guiding light for how we interact with others. During this tumultuous time, it is important that we come together, shoulder-to-shoulder, as a community and engage each other respectfully and work to understand other perspectives, ideas and beliefs. The Creed is not simply words written on a wall or sidewalk, but a fundamental principle in which every student should live by in order to help bring about positive change to our university and our society. At the end of the day, we don’t have to agree with each other, but the Creed requests us to act with integrity in all of our interactions, particularly those that require us to acknowledge each other’s differences.Good luck on finals Buffs and Happy Holidays! Colorado CreedCategories:Deadlines & AnnouncementsCampus Community Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Campus Q&A: New Graduate School dean feels honored to be in role

first_img Published: Aug. 30, 2019 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Scott Adler came to CU Boulder in fall 1996, when he joined the faculty as a professor of political science. He became dean of the Graduate School in June 2019.Adler served as chair of the political science department and was founding director of the department’s American Politics Research Lab. He also served as director of the Center to Advance Research and Teaching in the Social Sciences (CARTSS), 2016-18, and as director of graduate studies in political science, 2013-16.Adler earned doctoral and master’s degrees in political science from Columbia University, and his bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Michigan.As dean, Adler’s vision for the Graduate School focuses on broadening the accessibility of CU Boulder’s graduate programs to a wider range of students, while also enabling students to gain knowledge and skills that go beyond a single discipline or field of study. In this academic leadership position, Adler plans to support and expand the many successful initiatives in place to enhance the experience of graduate students and the quality of graduate education at CU Boulder. He is honored to be in this position and work with some of the finest graduate students anywhere.What attracted you to the Graduate School dean’s position?Having the opportunity to work with the spectacular group of people in creating new opportunities and training programs, and being able to send our students off to great jobs is exciting to me.I’ve been involved in graduate education since arriving at CU. Over the years, I have given considerable thought to how we could improve opportunities for our graduate students. Directing CARTSS was an opportunity to look at what we were doing in all the social and behavior sciences, so I became more involved with the Graduate School, creating new programs and training opportunities in an interdisciplinary fashion.Recently, as a member of Academic Futures, I got excited about re-imagining CU’s future and being involved in the long-term planning of a comprehensive public research university. When this position for dean opened, I jumped at it. It was an opportunity to meld all my interests together: long-term vision for the campus, the value I place on graduate education, and my interest in forward-thinking and positive change for our students. What will you miss about your work in the political science department?Being in the classroom with students. There’s nothing like that interaction. For years I’ve been teaching American politics, and right now is an especially exciting time to be studying politics. I’ll miss that. I’m hoping for the chance to be back in the classroom, particularly in interacting with graduate students in a scholarly setting. As well, I loved involving graduate students in my research. I had a big research program over the last few years, which allowed me to bring graduate students into the work I’m excited about. As a means of helping them do the work they wanted to do, we created the American Politics Research Lab several years ago. It was an exciting space where undergraduates, graduate students and faculty could come together, share ideas, help one another and build opportunities to advance, promote and integrate each other’s research. There’s nothing like that intellectual give and take. I’ll miss talking with students about their research plans, helping them develop their research agendas and cultivating them into full-fledged scholars. I’d like to continue to do this, but on a grander scale. What excites you the most about being dean of the Graduate School?The Graduate School is the crossroads of all that we do from a scholarly perspective. I’m really excited to work closely with all disciplines, departments, colleges and schools across campus and collaborate with them on exploring interdisciplinary opportunities and creating new degrees and certificate programs.What do you consider to be the hallmark of the Graduate School at CU Boulder?The Graduate School has many hallmarks. Our programs across disciplines receive top national and international recognition year after year. Our faculty bring in a tremendous amount of research funding for projects that attract some of the finest graduate students anywhere. And, our recent expansion of master’s and professional degree is significant. On top of all this, we continue to improve the experience for all of our graduate students through our peer mentoring program, our writing seminars and retreats, and our dedication to helping students prepare and explore the vast career opportunities available to them in and beyond the academy.What do you want undergraduates to know about getting a graduate degree?I want us to be connecting with potential students across the state who perhaps have not considered graduate school. There are some very good students who get a bachelor’s degree, but no one has presented the idea of going to graduate school to earn a master’s degree, a PhD or a professional degree. We should be talking to them and telling them what they gain by getting a degree beyond their bachelor’s degree. Maybe they don’t understand how the funding works or what future opportunities it will afford them. So, we’re starting to develop a plan to reach out to more of those students who haven’t traditionally thought about graduate school. Additionally, I’d like to break down barriers. For a long time, I’ve been interested in making it easier for students to move between units and get training that goes beyond their own department or college. I’d like to see more of our students take advantage of the fantastic scholarship and training available across our campus.While for years we have thought of our research as problem-oriented rather than discipline-oriented, we’ve not done the same with our graduate education and training. There are many opportunities in academe to take advantage of the interdisciplinary synergies, and I’d like the Graduate School to encourage more cross-over between different disciplines for our graduate students.When and why did you choose political science?Politics was always a topic of conversation at the dinner table in our house when growing up. By the time I was a teenager, I had worked on several political campaigns, and in college I quickly gravitated to political science as a major. I discovered I really liked the research angle in my courses.A teaching assistant in one of my classes—a graduate student—started talking to me about graduate school and guided me through the process. Faculty members in the department helped me while considering different graduate schools. Eventually I determined that if I’m going to pursue research, I would need to get a PhD. I spent some time in Washington, D.C., between undergraduate and graduate school and realized that studying Congress fascinated me. I’ve never looked back from there. What does your free time look like?I have a corgi named Albus Dumbledore, who is always underfoot. He was a rescue from the Humane Society. My family and I spend lot of time outdoors—hiking, camping, snowboarding, and taking full advantage of Colorado. Part of the reason I took this job is because I felt invested in Boulder, CU and Colorado. Categories:Faculty in FocusCampus Communitylast_img read more

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